Olympia

High School

1302 North Street
Olympia, WA 98501
Phone: (360) 596-7000
Attendance: (360) 596-7003
Fax: (360) 596-7001

Honors Biology schedule and homework for June 19-23, updated June 18 @ 10:00 AM PDT.

NOTE:  It is not realistic to expect that your first exposure to a concept will result in understanding....just like learning a new language.  Do not allow yourself to become frustrated.  With effort and repetition, you will gain the clarity your brain so desires.


IT IS VERY IMPORTANT FOR YOU TO STUDY EVERY DAY FOR AT LEAST HALF AN HOUR.  OTHERWISE THE FINAL EXAM WILL LOWER YOUR GRADE IN THE CLASS.  EVERY YEAR I SEE IT HAPPEN.  STUDENTS DO NOT PREPARE FOR THE FINAL AND THEIR GRADE GOES DOWN (SOMETIMES SIGNIFICANTLY) AS A RESULT.  THERE WILL BE NO TEST CORRECTIONS FOR THIS TEST.  AND REMEMBER THAT AS YOU LEARN THE NEW MATERIAL, YOU MUST ALSO REVIEW THE MATERIAL FROM THE BEGINNING OF THE SCHOOL YEAR.  ON THE OTHER HAND, THERE ARE ALWAYS SOME STUDENTS WHO HEED MY ADVICE/WARNINGS AND END UP DOING VERY WELL ON THE FINAL AND SEE THEIR GRADE IN THE CLASS GO UP.  IF YOU SEE YOUR FINAL SEMESTER GRADE ON SKYWARD AND NOTE THAT YOU ARE A FRACTION OF A POINT SHORT OF THE NEXT GRADE UP, PLEASE DO NOT EMBARRASS YOURSELF BY BEGGING OR PLEADING WITH ME.  THE ONLY WAY I WILL CHANGE A GRADE IS IF AN ERROR ON MY PART CAN BE DOCUMENTED.  IT'S UP TO YOU.

 

* Monday - Finish body systems;  EXPERIENCTIAL LEARNING SUBMISSION FORMS DUE

* Tuesday - Review; all periods

* Wednesday - Review 1st and 2nd in the morning.  FINAL EXAM PERIODS 1 AND 2 in the afternoon

* Thursday - Review 5th and 6th in the morning.  FINAL EXAM PERIODS 3 AND 4 in the afternoon.

* Friday - FINAL EXAMS FOR PERIODS 5 AND 6 in the morning.......early release for students......HAPPY SUMMER!

 

The following is a practice test just for mammalian/human body systems.  bodysystempractice.pdf

Last week:

* Monday - Mammalian/Human body systems.....Follow this in order all week. human-1.doc

* Tuesday - Mammalian/Human body systems

* Wednesday - Mammalian/Human body systems

* Thursday - Mammalian/Human body systems

* Friday - Mammalian/Human body systems 

 

The following is a practice test just for mammalian/human body systems.  bodysystempractice.pdf

 

Week before last:

* Monday - Chordates - This phylum includes mostly Vertebrates, but also some of the transitional forms.  Bring this:  chordateorganizer.doc

* Tuesday - Vertebrate adaptations to life on land.  See notes and links below.

* Wednesday - Finish chordate diversity....shift to mammals and organ systems.  We will proceed through this in order....don't get behind.  human-1.doc

* Thursday - Focus on mammals (using humans as our model organism).  Meet your new study partner....human-1.doc

* Friday - Slam Fest....very short classes, but hey, we'll cover whatever we can in the time allotted.

 

General comments about seed germination lab reports (added at 5:00 PM 11 June)  You're getting better with lab reports.  You're referencing data to support deductive statements.  You're following the standard format for controlled experiments.  You're doing better at tabulating and graphing data.  Now we need to go to the next level.  Here's my impressions of these reports, but keep in mind that these are general comments, and may not apply to all of you.  1.  You're not analyzing critically.  For example, you have these general trends that in many cases were amazingly similar for each of the independent variables, but you tend to focus on even the most slight difference.  Most of the independent variables I saw in your experiments resulted in non significant differences, and yet you focus on the slightest difference.  We're not doing statistical analyses here (there is a math issue involved), but you should by now realize that minor departures from a mean are "meaningless."  2.  Only one of you in all 4 classes pointed out the most obvious change.....that in the first 24 hours, the change in mass was by far the most significant change of all days, and that this change is almost certainly a result of absorption (imbibition) of water.  It has nothing to do with cell division or subsequent growth.  In some cases (very cold or very high temperatures) there was no change in mass after the first day.  Duh.  3.  Limitations:  There are so many, and I was looking for one or two, but in many cases found none.  Examples of the limitations of this lab:  The experiment was conducted in lab conditions, not in soil.  Time was very limited, and the trends could very well change after extended time.  We cannot attribute the change in mass to anything more than additional absorption of water as a result of the (obvious) increase in the number of cells....as in photosynthesis had not yet taken over from endosperm as the source of food for the plant.  But I did not read a single lab report that was not better than anything I could produce at your age, and look at me now......a published author of numerous peer-reviewed research papers.

 

Want some details about chordates?  Check this out:  chordatetable-8.doc

Animal evolution and diversity practice test with answers:  animaldiversity.pdf

This one is empty  invertebratetable.doc  This is the same one filled in. major_phyla_of_invertebrate_animals.doc 

This is a nice phylogenetic representation to help.  http://faculty.ycp.edu/~kkleiner/fieldnaturalhistory/fnhimages/l17images/animalphylogeny.jpg

Notes for the week:  The following are some of the more important evolutionary adaptations to life on land.

The Amnion:  Reptiles, birds, and mammals have a protective, membraneous covering around the developing embryo called an amnion or amnionic sac.  The amnion is filled with fluid.  In birds and reptiles, (and monotreme mammals), the amnion is surrounded by a hard shell and the embryo is nourished by a yolk sac.  In placental mammals, the embryo (and later the fetus) is nourished by the placenta, which is the link to the mother's blood.  Marsupial mammal embryos start out in an amniotic sac, are born live, and moved to a "pouch" where they start sucking milk until they emerge.  Fish and amphibian eggs do not have amniotic protection, which is essential for reproduction away from water.

The problem of nitrogenous waste elimination:  When proteins are metabolized for energy, the amine group of all the amino acids comes off and forms ammonium ions NH4+ (typically referred to a "ammonia"), which becomes toxic at relatively low levels.  Fish eliminate ammonia mostly through their gills since they're in water all the time.  Terrestrial vertebrates can't drink enough water to do that.  Amphibians, reptiles, and birds convert ammonia to uric acid (concentrated and less toxic), and excrete that along with feces through their cloaca. Mammals convert ammonia to urea, which goes out through the urethra in urine.  We still have to drink plenty of water, but not 20 gallons a day.  As you might imagine, water conservation is a critical adaptation to life on land.

Evolution of the vertebrate heart:  We have a heart with 4 chambers (two pumps).  The pump on your right side pumps blood through the lungs (pulmonary circuit).  The pump on the left pumps blood through your body systems (systemic circuit/body circuit).  Both beat in synchrony.  Birds also have a 4 chambered heart, and so do crocodilians (crocs and gators).  But reptiles and amphibians have a less sophisticated heart that allows for oxygen rich and oxygen poor blood to mix.  This is less efficient.  Fishes have a 2 chambered heart, and this is the least efficient of all.  The fish heart is connected to only one circuit, which passes through both the gills and the body systems.  NOTE:  It appears that crocodilians are more closely related evolutionarily to birds than they are to reptiles, and thus I will go on record as predicting that in the future, the crocodilians will get their own class, separate from both reptiles and birds.  http://www.ideacenter.org/stuff/contentmgr/files/38ed8a0c6db7a4f1a37e405922c364bd/misc/hearts.jpg

the_evolution_of_the_vertebrate_heart.doc

 

Don't forget about this.

ANIMALS:  The animals (mulicellular, eukaryotic, hetertrophic organisms, with cells lacking cell walls)...aka the MESOZOANS, first appeared about 800 million years ago (3 billion years after the origin of life, and one billion years after the first eukaryotes).  Actually, there are scientists who will say this date is much later, and some will say much earlier than the first multicellulars, so we won't worry about WHEN, only the succession and diversification.  The following being based on the fossil record:  The first animals were most likely something like the sponges, many species of which have survived to the present.  At about 550 million years ago (all life in the water still), there was a rapid increase in animal diversity (the Cambrian Explosion).  This resulted in all of the phyla of animals that have survived to the present, along with many other phyla that are long since extinct.  The reason for this sudden increase in diversity is not clear, but the recent discovery of HOX genes makes the very rapid rate possible (computer models are wonderful tools).  As the plants colonized land (producers), the animals followed.  The adaptions in the animal world parallel those of the plant world.  Life away from water presents challenges, and just as plants eventually adapted to very dry habitats, the animals followed.  Imagine a desert scene with cacti and lizards.  Did you know that desert lizards don't excrete liquid urine?  That would be a waste of water.  You already know that cacti close their stomata during the day.  We're talking serious adaptations.  First the reptiles with their hard eggs (which must be fertilized before the shell develops), then the birds (also hard shell eggs), and mammals (3 groups: monotremes-hard eggs, marsupials-pouches, and the placental mammals...like us).  The following image goes along with the tables I made for you, but shows the branching patterns, which is more accurate than my linear representtion.  I suggest that you print this picture to help guide you as you complete the graphical organizers:  http://faculty.ycp.edu/~kkleiner/fieldnaturalhistory/fnhimages/l17images/animalphylogeny.jpg

To make the move from water to land, terrestrial chordates had to adapt in ways that allowed them to overcome obstacles not encountered in water.  Including:  Protection from desiccation; breathing air; a skeleton that could deal with gravity; reproduction (protecting the egg/embryo); and elimination of nitrogenous waste without drinking excessive amounts of water.  Reptiles are the most water efficient of the vertebrates.  The amphibians represent the transition from water to land in their life cycle, starting life as a fish-like larva, and then growing to maturity as a reptile-like tetrapod as an adult.  Bony fish have a swim bladder for buoyancy, and air-breathing vertebrates have lungs.  Both appear to have evolved from the air bladder of now-extinct fishes (fossils).  The air bladder was connected to the throat as are lungs.  The swim bladder is not connected to the throat.   Vertebrates moved onto the land close to the evolution of gymnosperm plants around 350 MYA, maybe a bit sooner.  They had some very handy jaws by then, and the 4 legs allowed them to move into diverse niches.  It only took that first terrestrial vertebrate 100 MY to evolve to a dinosaur.  ("Only" 100,000,000 years!)  Amphibians gave rise to reptiles with hard shelled eggs.  Reptiles gave rise to both birds and mammals from different lineages of reptile.  The crocadilians (crocs and gators and such) appear to have evolved from yet another branch of dinosaur, and are as closely related to birds (probably more so) than they are to reptiles.

Mammalian body systems (notes, documents, and links):  Just sit back, relax, and enjoy the show(s).  It's just like binge watching.

Body tissue types:

1.  Epithelial - Epithelial tissues LINE both the outside of the body, and the passages and cavities within the body.  There are numerous sub categories.

2.  Connective tissue - As the name implies, connective tissue connects itself and other tissues together.  Bone, ligaments, tendons and cartilage are common examples.  Blood is also considered connective tissue.

3.  Muscle tissue - Smooth muscle is found in the walls of the stomach, intestines, and blood vessels, especially arteries.  Cardiac muscles dominate the heart ventricles, and are the strongest muscles we have.  Skeletal muscles allow us to move, yet are sometimes involuntary (blinking and breathing are skeletal muscle-controlled activities), but in such cases we can take over.  Conscious control of skeletal muscle is directed by the cerebral cortex of the brain (thinking, processing, awareness).  Involuntary muscle contractions are controlled by the deeper parts of the brain.

4.  Nervous tissue - While neurons are the primary cells of the nervous system, they depend on glial cells for support.

Homeostasis (here it is again):  A significant cross-cutting concept in biology (like that recurring theme of surface area to volume ration) is homeostasis.  In humans and other mammals, homeostasis is achieved primarily by the neuro-endocrine system, and the kidneys.  Here is a 2-page cheat sheet on homeostasis:  homeostasis.doc

Blood flow through the heart:  There are 4 one-way valves in the heart.  Their function is to keep the blood flowing in one direction with no back-flow.  PROBLEM:  Different sources refer to these valves by different names.  The heart has two pumps - one for the pulmonary/lung circuit and one for the systemic/body circuit - each of which has two chambers, the ATRIUM and the VENTRICLE.  The right pump (atrium and ventricle) receives oxygen depleted blood from the body. 

Heart valves:  1.  Right atrioventricular (AV) valve between the right atrium and the right ventricle.  aka TRICUSPID VALVE.  2.  Pulmonary valve between the right ventricle and the pulmonary artery...aka SEMILUNAR VALVE.  3.  The left atrioventricular (AV) valve between the left atrium and left ventricle, aka MITRAL valve.  and 4. The right semilunar valve, aka the AORTIC valve:  In summary:

Right AV valve = Tricuspid Valve

Left AV valve = Bicuspid Valve = Mitral Valve

Right semilunar valve = Pulmonary valve 

Left semilunar valve = Aortal valve

I tend to use the terms on the left side of the = sign because otherwise I forget which side the valve is on.  With this in mind, please watch this short video several times  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BEWjOCVEN7M  and/or this one:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l7ejcLxKW8c

Blood vessels:  Arteries carry blood away from the heart.  They are under intense pressure, and thus have very thick, muscular walls.  Because of arterial pressure, there is no need for one-way (check) valves.  Capillaries are the tiniest of blood vessels and the site of exchange (oxygen, carbon dioxide, food, hormones, wastes, etc).  After blood leaves capillaries (aka capillary beds), the pressure is very, very low.  Veins deliver blood back to the heart.  Because the pressure in veins is so low (with thin walls), they are equipped with one-way valves to prevent back-flow.  NOTE:  Do not fall prey to the false notion that arteries carry oxygen-rich blood, and veins carry oxygen-depleted blood, because the pulmonary veins and arteries will reverse this common misconception.

Blood pressure:  When blood leaves the heart into the systemic (body) circuit, it is under extremely high pressure.  We commonly measure the pressure of blood in the humeral artery (the upper arm).  Note:  BP is lower at the wrists, but the wrist cuffs are calibrated to humeral pressure.  When the ventricles contract, a wave of pressure moves along the arteries.  Blood pressure is measured in mm of mercury (that's the old fashioned way to do it....now we have electronic gizmos).  Here's a nice video on BP:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rc4vipEx__U

Muscle contraction:  Muscle cells are more commonly called muscle fibers.  Within the cells/fibers are long myofibrils made up of sarcomeres, end-to-end.  The sarcomere is the contractile unit.  The combined contraction of millions of sarcomeres in a muscle allows muscles to do what they do...contract and relax.  This video does a nice job of walking you through the process going from muscle down to sarcomeres and the molecules involved.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yiWgd-fnp2s

Neurons, impulse transmission (action potential), and synaptic junctions:  This link is to the first of several from Kahn Academy.  Pay attention to all 6 (they're not as long as most KA videos), and you'll have what you need.  https://www.khanacademy.org/science/biology/human-biology/neuron-nervous-system/v/anatomy-of-a-neuron

Structure and function of kidneys:  This 18 minute video from Kahn Academey pretty much takes care of the Exretory system.  The kidney contains millions of functional units called nephrons.  If you understand the nephron, you understand the kidney.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cc8sUv2SuaY

Endocrine system:  Part of the neuro-endocrine system, the endocrine system is the communication link between the brain and other body systems, and is central to the maintenance of homeostasis (and other body functions).  HORMONES are signal molecules made in one part of the body, transported in blood, and received elsewhere in the body (the proper receptor is required).  It works like this:  Signal>reception>response.  The relationship between the signal (hormone molecule) and the receptor (on or in a cell) is like a lock and key....only the target cells will pick up the signal.  Hormones are active in very, very low quantities, and they can result in a very, very fast response.  Chemically, hormones are either proteins or lipids.  Here's a one-page summary:  endocrine_gland.doc

Animal Behavior: There is a fine line between "response to stimuli" and behavior, but we do make the distinction.  All organisms respond to stimuli, but only the animals are said to exhibit behaviors.  Here is a 2-page cheat sheet on animal behavior: animal_behavior.doc

 

DON'T FORGET ABOUT THE PLANTS

Seed germination lab report:  Your report should include all components of our basic lab report format.  In a science report in biology, one must provide the scientific name of the organisms studied.  Make sure you correctly identify the independent and dependent variables and controls.  Data should be neatly and clearly tabulated.  The analysis should be succinct (to the point).  Identify and point out any trends you see in the data.  Be sure to reference the data in your deductive statements.  It is also important that you point out the limitations of the data set.  I'll give your "draft" a quick look and provide comments, but not after Wednesday.

Double fertilization in flowering plants:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bUjVHUf4d1I

plant_hormone_summary.doc  plant_growth_responses_and_pgrs.doc

Your main guide to plants:  the_plants.doc

Review of photosynthesis.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g78utcLQrJ4

In addition the "The Plants" guide, you need to read all of the following.  There may be some redundancy, but that's OK.  Repetition helps you learn. 

This is a rather long practice test, and it includes information outside the plant kingdom.  This is optional:  plantpracticetest.pdf

Plant growth:  Primary and secondary.  ALL plant growth (new cells) takes place in meristematic tissue.  Primary growth takes place in apical and axillary meristems of both the shoot and root.  Secondary growth is the increase in girth (thickness) of stems.  Secondary growth is the result of division of cells in a special type of meristematic tissue called the vascular cambium.  The cells of the vascular cambium divide into 1. more vascular cambium cell, and 2. xylem cell on the inside, or phloem on the outside.  As a tree grows, primary growth results in new leaves and increased height.  Secondary growth does not result in new organs (leaves, flowers, etc), but rather, secondary growth results in an increase in the girth of a woody plant.

Plant Growth Regulators  Plant growth responses and the chemicals that are involved.  Plants grow directionally, most commonly toward the sun.  But plants also grow in response to gravity (roots down, shoots up).  Plants know when to flower.  Fruits know when to ripen.  Deciduous trees know when and how to drop their leaves.  Vines have modified leaves called tendrils, and they go around and around searching for something to hold onto, and when they find it, they wrap around it tightly and pull up the slack.  Some plants flower in response to either increasing day length (long day plants flower before the solstice) or decreasing day length (short day plants flower in late summer or fall).  All of these responses are controlled by plant growth regulators (plant hormones).  This is the topic of chapter 11 in your text, and "The Plants" instructs you to read that chapter.  If you don't have the time, motivation, or stamina to read all of chapter 11, then take notes, and read Wednesday's "plant hormone summary."

Monocotyledons and Dicotyledons (monocots and dicots):  Angiosperms (flowering plants) are very commonly divided into two basic types, based primarily on whether the embryo in the seed has one or two seed leaves (cotyledons).  In gymnosperms there are multiple cotyledons, and in the spore plants there are no seeds and thus no seed leaves.  Monocots are more complex and more recently evolved than dicots.  Here's a simple organizer....monocots_and_dicots.doc  If you bring this to class and ask me, I will explain what goes in the empty boxes. 

Vascular system:  Xylem and phloem are the bundles of tiny tubes that make up the vascular system of plants (veins in leaves; vascular bundles in roots and stems).  In general, it's "xylem upum and phloem downum," but the phloem is a bit more than that.  Water enters plants (usually) through the roots.  <10% of water taken up through plants is used for photosynthesis (water is the source of atmospheric oxygen) and other metabolic processes.  Most of the water that moves passively through plants (>90%) exits through stomata, and maintains the essential turgor pressure of plant cells.  Recall that plant cells have a central vacuole that exerts pressure on the cell wall.  When mature and active, xylem cells are dead.  Their cell walls are thickened and strengthened with lignin.  In woody plants, the secondary xylem becomes wood, which is mostly cellulose and lignin.  Phloem consists of living cells.  Phloem cells (like xylem) come in bundles within veins.  Phloem cells must be alive because they must actively transport sugars and other metabolites first into their cells and then throughout the plant - often against a concentration gradient.  Roots, for example, need ATP, and to make it they need sugar from the leaves transported down through the phloem.   fluid_transport.doc

Inorganic minerals are essential for plant growth.  Minerals enter the plant via the roots in the form of charged ions (redundant, since all ions are charged).  As you recall, the transport of ions across membranes is always active, and therefore root cells must expend some energy just to get the ions into the xylem.  But since the xylem cells are dead, and there are no membranes to pass through, ions moving through the xylem get a free ride over the long haul, then must be actively transported through membranes as they enter the cells where they are needed.  Please pay careful attention to figure 7.4, p. 189.

Essential nutrients (elements) for plants:  Carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen enter the plant as either carbon dioxide (through leaves) or water (through roots).  Other essential nutrients include N, P, K, S, Ca, Fe, and Mg.  C HOPKNS CaFe Mg.  These are the MACRONUTRIENTS, because they are required in significant amounts.  Most of the mass of a plant consists of water and carbon.  Carbon is free.  Water (irrigation) can be very costly.  To remember which elements they are, just remember this little ditty:  See Hopkins cafe....mighty good (C HOPKNS CaFe Mg).  In addition, plants may or may not need some or all of the following MICRONUTRIENTS:  Mo, B, Cl, Mn, Cu, Zn.  In general, micronutrients are needed in tiny quantities, but in some cases, their absence can significantly reduce crop yield.  Boron (B) for example is very important for peanuts, and is commonly applied to seed before planting.  Other crops do just fine in the absence of boron.  Most soils will have enough micronutrients, but in agricultural systems, we take no chances, especially since the cost for applying micronutrients is very low.

Flower anatomy:  Please focus your attention on figure 12.11 on p. 327.  In regard to fertilization in flowering plants, pay careful attention to Tuesday's video (above).

The Plants.  While photosynthetic bacteria and protists had been around for several billion years, the plants (terrestrial) first appeared in the fossil record around 450 million years ago.  This is well after the Cambrian Explosion of animal phyla.  Since plants form the base of terrestrial ecosystems, there was no life that we know of out of the water (on land) before this time.  After billions of years in the water, a group of green algae (the Charophyceans) adapted to life on land.  This would involve numerous adaptations, just as a transition from aquatic to terrestrial involved numerous adaptations in the animal kingdom.  There are may parallels between plant and animal adaptations.  Prevention from drying out for starters, and then we see in both groups an increased ability to live further and further from water.   Another parallel scenario is that like animals (ex. dolphins), some plants returned to the water...like water lilies.  Also like animals (ex, desert-dwelling reptiles), some plants adapted themselves to extremely dry conditions, like deserts.  Whatever environment plants were able to adapt to, animals invariably followed.  It is important to note that the Fungi, via their mycorrhizal associations, were "holding hands" with the plants as they braved new and exotic worlds, taking their vestigial cyanobacteria (chloroplasts) with them everywhere they went. 

Plant reproduction:  All plants reproduce sexually, and many species also reproduce asexually.  Where plants differ from animals is in their alternation of generations.  All plants have multicellular haploid and multicellular diploid life stages.  The evolutionary trend is from a dominant haploid stage (the GAMETOPHYTE) to a dominant diploid stage (the SPOROPHYTE).

Life cycle drawings:  For each of the 4 main groups of plants, you will draw a representative sexual life cycle.  The drawings should be one per page on plain white paper, showing meiosis, fertilization, gametes, and the ploidy (haploid and diploid) stages of the life cycle.  The four groups in order of appearance are; BRYOPHYTES, PTER(ID)OPHYTES, GYMNOSPERMS, AND ANGIOSPERS.  Examples, respectively, are mosses, ferns, conifers, and flowering plants.  These will be due next week (probably Tuesday), but you don't want to wait until Monday night to get started, do you?

 

 

Archived downloads and links

Spillover:  http://www.pbs.org/video/2365815991/

vaccine video:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wqbH40Y9XJw

immune responses:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zQGOcOUBi6s

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/hunting-the-nightmare-bacteria/

Herd immunity:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZuiHFg_nfnE

This has been updated:  2732.infectious_disease_vocabulary.doc

common_infectious_diseses-_classified.doc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZuiHFg_nfnE

Test 3 break

2732.introduction_to_viruses.doc

whittakersprotists.pdf

kingdom_protista.pdf

eukaryote_phylogeny.pdf

the_fungi-5.doc

Test 2 break

ecosystemcheatsheet.doc

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/georgemonbiot/2014/dec/12/how-whale-poo-is-connected-to-climate-and-our-lives

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IVBCrzjOl40

antibiotics.doc

history_of_life_on_earth.doc

history_of_life_on_earth-14.pdf

deep_history_of_life.doc

haeckel1866-1.pdf

tolmmbr2009-3.pdf

threedomains.pdf

primordial_soup.jpg

bacteria-archaea-11.doc

bacterial_gene_regulation.doc

Test 1 Break

evolution_practice.pdf

patterns_of_evolution.doc

evolution_of_cells.doc

radiometric_dating.doc

radiometric_dating_problems.doc

https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/evolution/library/01/4/pdf/l_014_02.pdf

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/09/150910-human-evolution-change/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9sjwlxQ_6LI

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n8Cru41w5uI

radiometric_decay_series.pdf

ptclab.doc

hw_problems.doc

More Hardy-Weinberg problems:  http://www.k-state.edu/parasitology/biology198/hardwein.html

evidence_for_evolution_by_way_of_common_descent.doc

evolution101.doc

concepts_in_the_study_of_evolution-2.doc

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/09/150910-human-evolution-change/

End of first semester:

pedigree_analysis.pdf

http://www.execulink.com/~ekimmel/karyotype_drag_and_drop.swf

common_genetic_disorders_in_humans.doc

pedigree_analysis.pdf

chi_square_test.doc  corn_genetics_lab.doc

terms_related_to_meiosis__and_some_perspective.doc

Contrasting mitosis and meiosis:  6:45  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jjEcHra3484

Meiosis video:  5:30   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nMEyeKQClqI

http://www.execulink.com/~ekimmel/karyotype_drag_and_drop.swf 

Test 5:

terms_related_to_meiosis__and_some_perspective.doc

Contrasting mitosis and meiosis:  6:45  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jjEcHra3484

Meiosis video:  5:30   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nMEyeKQClqI

medelian_inheritance_____level_1.doc

bacterial_gene_regulation.doc

microbial_genetics.doc

the genetic_code-4.doc   and  gene_expression.doc

transcription_translation_mutation.doc

transcription_and_translation.doc

Videos related to gene expression:

The Crash Course guy covers it all in his own annoying (to me) way, 14 minutes  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=itsb2SqR-R0

Transcription, 2 minutes  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SMtWvDbfHLo

Translation, 3 minutes  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TfYf_rPWUdY

tRNA, 2 minutes  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B6O6uRb1D38&index=4&list=PL1AD35ADA1E93EB6F

Mutations,  6 minutes  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xYOK-yzUWSI

 

Test 4 break

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C6hn3sA0ip0

http://www.dnalc.org/resources/3d/07-how-dna-is-packaged-basic.html

I made this crossword puzzle for you:  cell_puzzle.pdf

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0JpOJ4F4984

1.interphase-with_nucleoilprophaser.jpg

2.early_prophaselmetaphaser.jpg

3.prophaselmetaphaser.jpg

4.prometaphaselc.jpg

5.metaphasel.jpg

6.early_anaphase_with_telophase-cytokinesisbelow.jpg

7.anaphase.jpg

8.telophase-cytokinesislc.jpg

9.telophasel.jpg

DNA Replication:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wcOZHK5bRLs

DNA from Bozeman:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q6PP-C4udkA

Inner life of the cell:  Harvard biologists made a bunch of computer-animated videos that are incredible.  This is some seriously cool stuff.  I'll show some short exerts in class as we come to that particular structure/function.  You can check it out as you like....it's amazing:  https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=inner+life+of+a+cell

endomembrane_system.doc

cytoskeleton.doc

evolution_of_cells.doc

Khan Academy cells:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hmwvj9X4GNY

Features of cells:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Z9pqST72is

cell_type_comparison.doc

Test 3 break:

plant_pigments.doc

completed_organizer.doc

14_photosynthesis.mp3

13_respiration__what_goes_in_what_comes_out.mp3

This is an excellent video overview of cellular respiration:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XIJvVCA9RPs

Photosynthesis video from the same production company:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QSFUHB8VnD0

Mr. Anderson's photosynthesis video:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g78utcLQrJ4

Hank's photosynthesis video:  https://video.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search?fr=yhs-Lkry-SF01&hsimp=yhs-SF01&hspart=Lkry&p=crash+course+photosynthesis#id=1&vid=5c917e42e2423538a0c3fba258e1fbef&action=click

Photosynthesis video game, tutorial, and quiz from Bioman:  http://www.biomanbio.com/GamesandLabs/PhotoRespgames/photointeractive.html

Ted Ed's Calvin Cycle video:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0UzMaoaXKaM

photosynthesis_overview.jpg

energetics-organizer.doc

cellular_respiration-1.doc

Test 2 break

sample_data_analyses.doc

water_potential-5.doc

 catalase_data.doc

lab_report_format-2.doc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g159zCnvpBs

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w3_8FSrqc-I

plant video:  https://archive.org/details/ThePrivateLifeOfPlants_581

test_correction_format.doc

grading_codes_for_lab_reports.pdf

biology_laboratory_safety.pdf

This 12 minute video will help you understand the concept and terminology of enzymes. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ok9esggzN18

Test 1 break

Water:  Hank https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HVT3Y3_gHGg

Carbohydrates:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_zm_DyD6FJ0

amino-acid-formulas.doc

Try this crossword puzzle I made (optional).     chemistrycrosswordclues.doc     chemistrycrossword.pdf

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VGHD9e3yRIU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Jgb_DpaQhM

functional_groups-3.doc

period_table_review.doc

http://www.sciencerox.net/PeriodicTables/AtomicRadius.pdf

molecularmodels.doc

ions-adics-bases-ph.doc

molecular_mass.doc

five_tips_for_success_in_honors_biology.doc

 

ABOUT TEST CORRECTIONS:  Because of issues in the past, I'm tightening up my test correction policy.  I reserved the right to disregard all submitted test corrections if I find that a student is purposefully attempting to submit phony test corrections.  For full credit, please follow these guidelines:  ONLY HAND WRITTEN CORRECTIONS WILL BE ACCEPTED FOR CREDIT.

1.  Do not:  Restate the question and/or answer options as written on the test.

2.  Do not:  Share your personal reflections on what you were thinking (or not thinking) while you were taking the test.

3.  Do not:  Say the same thing over and over again.

4.  DO:  Identify the concept that the question deals with.  Use 1/2 page to address that concept using words, labeled diagrams, etc.  test_correction_format.doc

5.  ALL TEST CORRECTIONS MUST BE HAND WRITTEN/DRAWN, AND LEGIBLE.