Olympia

High School

1302 North Street
Olympia, WA 98501
Phone: (360) 596-7000
Attendance: (360) 596-7003
Fax: (360) 596-7001

Week of 5/22

  • Vocabulary for the week (Add to your "Word of the Day" list:  ABSTEMIOUS, PUMMEL, HISTRIONIC, FECUNDITY, PROPINQUITY)
  • Read chapters 1 - 5 (PART 2) of Crime and Punishment by Monday, 5/22.
  • Read chapters 6 - 7 (PART 2) of Crime and Punishment by Wednesday, 5/24.
  • Read chapters 1 - 3 (PART 3) of Crime and Punishment by Thursday, 5/25.
  • RESEARCH ACTIVITY for Friday, 5/26: Research (briefly) the main philosophical ideas put forth by Hegel, Schopenhauer, Schiller, Comte, and Nietzsche. Look up the philosophy of nihilism, too.  Bullet 3 - 5 characteristics for each philosophy. Please cite your sources after each (2 sources min. per person/philosophy) using MLA formatting.  This should be typed or printed in pen.

Week of 5/15

  • Monday, 5/15:  In-class work time for essays.
  • Argumentative Essay for 1984.  Click here for assignment.  Click here for information about argumentative essays.  Click here for an outline that you can use to build an argumentative paper (this one comes from the University of Washington).  Due Tuesday, 5/16, at 11:59 on Turnitin.com
  • DGP REVIVAL:  DO "TUESDAY" (sentence parts & phrases) and "WEDNESDAY" (sentence type) for every sentence.  Here are the sentences:
    • TUESDAY:  But he found that a traveler's life is one that includes much pain amidst its enjoyments. -- Mary Shelley
    • WEDNESDAY:  How dreadful is the state of those that are daily and hourly in the danger of this great wrath and infinite misery -- Jonathan Edwards
    • FRIDAY:  If you consent neither you nor any other human being shall ever see us again; I will go to the vast wilds of South America -- Mary Shelley
  • Read chapters 1 - 4 of Crime and Punishment by Tuesday, 5/16.
  • Read chapters 5 - 7 of Crime and Punishment by Thursday, 5/18.
  • Read chapters 1 & 2 of Part 2 for Friday, 5/19.

Week of 5/8

  • Read the rest of the book for Monday, 5/8.  Be ready to seminar!  Journal #3 is due on Monday, 5/8.
  • DGP REVIVAL:  DO "TUESDAY" (sentence parts & phrases) and "WEDNESDAY" (sentence type) for every sentence.  Here are the sentences:
    • TUESDAY:  Could I enter into a festival with this deadly weight yet hanging round my neck and bowing me to the ground? -- Marry Shelley
    • WEDNESDAY:  When the newly married pair came home, the first person who appeared to offer his congratulations was Sydney Carton. -- Dickens
    • FRIDAY:  Arthur Miller who was born on October 17 195 in New York City New York wrote the play The Crucible.  [PUNCTUATE THIS SENTENCE, TOO!]
  • WRITING/WORK PERIOD on Thursday, 5/11.
  • Argumentative Essay for 1984.  Click here for assignment.  Click here for information about argumentative essays.  Click here for an outline that you can use to build an argumentative paper (this one comes from the University of Washington).  Due Tuesday, 5/16, at 11:59 on Turnitin.com

 Week of 5/1

  • (If you missed class on Friday, please see "What We Did In Class Today" and complete writing assignment; put in in class folder. [It's a 20- 25 minute write])
  • DGP REVIVAL:  We will be reviving DGP starting Monday, 5/1.  Our sentences for the week are more challenging and are derived from literature.  DO "TUESDAY" (sentence parts & phrases) and "WEDNESDAY" (sentence type) for every sentence, every day.  Here are the sentences:
    • MONDAY:  Go often to the house of thy friend for weeds choke the unused path.  -Ralph Waldo Emerson
    • WEDNESDAY:  Passepartout had a moist sensation about the eyes; his master's action touched his susceptible heart. -Jules Verne
    • THURSDAY:  She stood by the window and looked out dully at a gray cat walking a gray fence in a gray backyard.  -O. Henry
  • Read chapters 5 - 8 of Part 2 1984 for Monday, 5/1.
  • Read the rest of Part 2 (You may skip Goldstein's book, if you wish) for Tuesday, 5/2Journal #2 is due on Tuesday, 5/2
  • Read chapters 1- 3 of Part 3 for Friday, 5/5.
  • Read the rest of the book for Monday, 5/8 Be ready to seminar!  Journal #3 is due on Monday, 5/8.

Week of 4/24

  • Read chapters 2 - 5 for Monday, 4/24.
  • Complete journal assignment for 1984 for these chapters (2 - 5) by Tuesday, 4/25 (you will have class time on Tuesday).  Click here for journal assignment. 
  • Read chapters 6 - 8 for Wednesday, 4/26.  Journal will be date-stamped.
  • Read chapters 1- 2 of Part 2 for Thursday, 4/27.
  • Read chapters 3 - 4 of Part 2 for Friday, 4/28.

Week of 4/17

Week of 4/10

  • Fallacy project presentations (scripts are due, too!):  Monday, 4/10.
  • Turn in annotated speeches and rough draft for speech essay on Tuesday 4/11.
  • Read Act 4 of Julius Caesar by Tuesday 4/11.
  • Turn in all handouts that are marked "CO" with appropriate corrections by Wednesday, 4/12.
  • Read Act 5 of Julius Caesar by Thursday, 4/13.  We will sign up for Act 5 on Wednesday, 4/12.
  • SBA practice on Friday, 4/14.

Week of 3/27

  • Print "fallacy" handout  for class on Tuesday, 3/28.  We will complete the definitions in class.
  • We will read this story in class on Tuesday, 3/28.  You don't need to print it (unless you want to), but you will want to access it on your phone!
  • Write an essay that analyzes the effectiveness of rhetorical devices within a notable speech.  See directions in this handout
    • Annotated speech is due Wednesday, 3/29.
    • Hard copy of essay is due for peer edit on Wednesday, 3/29.  
    • Turn in revised, ERROR-FREE copy on Turnitin.com: Sunday, 4/2 by 11:59 PM. (Should be 1 - 2 pages, single spaced.)
    • Turn in peer edit sheet, rough draft, and ANNOTATED SPEECH on Tuesday, 4/11.
  • Finish filling out "Logical Fallacies" handout:  Definition and example required for each.  Due:  Friday, 3/31.

Week of 3/20

  • Print the Argument & Persuasion handout for Monday, 3/20.
  • Analyze Brutus's speech for schemes and tropes.  Write sentence numbers on paper, and write relevant schemes/tropes for that sentence.  Due Tuesday, 3/21.
  • Write an essay that analyzes the effectiveness of rhetorical devices within a notable speech.  See directions in this handout.  Hard copy is due for peer edit on Wednesday, 3/29.   Turn in revised copy on Turnitin.com: Sunday, 4/2 by 11:59 PM. (Should be 1 - 2 pages, single spaced.)

Week of 3/13

  • Write a mini-essay (1 page) wherein you compare the two domestic scenes in Act II.  The inductive work should have explored the differences & similarities between Calpurnia and Portia and how they relate to their husbands; likewise the similarities & differences between the ways the husbands interact with their wives.  Then, narrow your focus and write about the most compelling thing you see in the domestic scenes.     REMEMBER:  THIS ESSAY IS NOT SIMPLY A POINTS-OF-COMPARISON LIST.  YOU MUST TAKE A POSITION.  WHY DO THE DIFFERENCES AND/OR COMMONALITIES MATTER?  Due Monday, 3/13 at 11:59 PM. on Turnitin.com.
  • Print TROPE handout for Monday, 3/13; FIND EXAMPLES for each trope for Thursday, 3/16; note that some should come from 3.1 in JULIUS CAESAR
  • Read Act 3, scene 1 for Monday, 3/13.
  • Bring a hard copy of your Act 2 essay to class on Tuesday, 3/14.
  • Put a picture of a person -- other than Caesar -- who was assassinated (for political reasons) on the cover of your book.  Be ready to share why you chose that person and why that person was assassinated on Tuesday, 3/14.
  • FIND LITERARY EXAMPLES (or, at least, clever examples) for each trope; note that some should come from 3.1 in JULIUS CAESAR (please cite the lines)!  Due on Thursday, 3/16.
  • Read Act 3, scene 2 for Thursday, 3/16.
  • Write a 1/2 page reaction to Brutus's "funeral oration" as if you were a plebeian listening to him speak, so use "I"!  Consider the following questions:  What did he say that you liked?  What did he say that was convincing or not convincing?  Were you struck by his nobility, his reasons, or the way he made you feel?  Did you agree with the reactions of your fellow plebeians?  What did you feel as Antony approached the podium?  Due on Friday, 3/17.
  • Syntax handout is needed in class on Friday, 3/17.

Week of 3/6

  • Write a response to the following prompt for Act I of Julius Caesar:   Act I is the exposition of the play and, as such, it establishes the setting, creates character, and introduces conflicts.  Motifs, symbols, and themes also begin to emerge.  Choose one of the TITLES below (or come up with a clever one of your own), and craft a 1-page (single-spaced/typed) paper that explains the idea suggested in the title.  Although all writing must have a thesis, this is NOT a 5-part paragraph; write freely, but organize logically!  "Write from your CLAIM/THESIS, not just from your quotations. Make an argument!"  Due Monday, 3/6 at 11:59 PM.  Bring a hard copy to class on Tuesday, 3/7.  (See the attached for an example.)
        • The Role of Playing It "Dumb"
        • The Art of Seduction
        • The Devil is in the Details -- the significance of syntax [or "spare language" or diction or ?] in Act I
        • Superstitions and Other Portentous Things
        • Civil Wars -- political, personal, and preternatural (i.e., Civil Strife in Heaven [1.3.11)
        • First Impressions
        • Free versus Captive
        • Macho, Macho Man:  What it Means to be Roman
        • The Village People:  The role of the Plebeian in Act I
        • Vulnerabilities, Vanities, and ________________
  • Read Act 2, scene 1 of Julius Caesar for Monday, 3/6.
  • Bring a hard copy of your Act 1 essay to class on Tuesday, 3/7.
  • Read the rest of Act 2 for Wednesday, 3/8.
  • Write a mini-essay (1 page) wherein you compare the two domestic scenes in Act II.  The inductive work should have explored the differences & similarities between Calpurnia and Portia and how they relate to their husbands; likewise the similarities & differences between the ways the husbands interact with their wives.  Then, narrow your focus and write about the most compelling thing you see in the domestic scenes.     REMEMBER:  THIS ESSAY IS NOT SIMPLY A POINTS-OF-COMPARISON LIST.  YOU MUST TAKE A POSITION.  WHY DO THE DIFFERENCES AND/OR COMMONALITIES MATTER?  Due Monday, 3/13 on Turnitin.com

Week of 2/27

  • Read scene 3 (Act 1) of Julius Caesar for Wednesday, 3/1
  • Write a response to the following prompt for Act I of Julius Caesar:   Act I is the exposition of the play and, as such, it establishes the setting, creates character, and introduces conflicts.  Motifs, symbols, and themes also begin to emerge.  Choose one of the TITLES below (or come up with a clever one of your own), and craft a 1-page (single-spaced/typed) paper that explains the idea suggested in the title.  Although all writing must have a thesis, this is NOT a 5-part paragraph; write freely, but organize logically!  "Write from your CLAIM/THESIS, not just from your quotations. Make an argument!"  Due Monday, 3/6 at 11:59 PM.  Bring a hard copy to class on Tuesday, 3/7.  (See the attached for an example.)
        • The Role of Playing It "Dumb"
        • The Art of Seduction
        • The Devil is in the Details -- the significance of syntax [or "spare language" or diction or ?] in Act I
        • Superstitions and Other Portentous Things
        • Civil Wars -- political, personal, and preternatural (i.e., Civil Strife in Heaven [1.3.11)
        • First Impressions
        • Free versus Captive
        • Macho, Macho Man:  What it Means to be Roman
        • The Village People:  The role of the Plebeian in Act I
        • Vulnerabilities, Vanities, and ________________

  • Read Act 2, scene 1 of Julius Caesar for Thursday, 3/2.
  • Word Power quiz, sessions 32 & 33 for Friday, 3/3.

Week of 2/22

  • No Word Power this week!
  • Read scene 1 & 2 in Act 1 of Julius Caesar for Wednesday, 2/22.  Be ready to read if you signed up for a part! [IF YOU WERE ABSENT AND DIDN'T GET A BOOK, PLEASE KNOW THAT JULIUS CAESAR IS EASILY ACCESSED ON-LINE!  SO, NO EXCUSES.]

Week of 2/13

  • Creative Writing Notebook #5:  "Intro. to a Romance Novel":  Use FIVE of this semester's SAT vocabulary words to write the beginning of a a CHEESY romance novel.  Be sure to include an intriguing TITLE and, of course, characteristics of the Romance genre (e.g., Byronic hero, melodramatic situations and language; sensory details; ADJECTIVE-HEAVY; too much alliteration; lots of internal dialogue; hyperbolic language; cliches; and insipid conversation).  No vulgarity or bawdy language/situations, please.  1 - 2 pages, typed, single-spaced.  Due Tuesday, 2/14.  UNDERLINE VOCABULARY WORDS!!!
  • Apply the "Levels of Generality" to the "Weasel is Wild" paragraph.  Due with packet on Thursday, 2/16.  (Make sure you have also highlighted the topics in the "Weasel" paragraph.)
  • Print "SYNTAX" handout for Thursday, 2/16.  (Just print it, and bring it in to class.  That's all!)
  • Turn in "Clarity, Cohesion, & Coherence" handout with homework/classwork.  Due Thursday, 2/16.
  • Word Power quiz on session 30 & 31:  Friday, 2/17.

Week of 2/6

  • Word Power quiz on session 28 & 29:  Friday, 2/10.
  • Faulty parallelism interactive website.  Read and know the FIVE RULES of parallel structure.  I would encourage you to do at least a few of the interactive quizzes/exercises.  Quiz on faulty parallelism:  Friday, 2/10.
  • Creative Writing Notebook #5:  "Intro. to a Romance Novel":  Use FIVE of this semester's SAT vocabulary words to write the beginning of a a CHEESY romance novel.  Be sure to include an intriguing TITLE and, of course, characteristics of the Romance genre (e.g., Byronic hero, melodramatic situations and language; sensory details; ADJECTIVE-HEAVY; too much alliteration; lots of internal dialogue; hyperbolic language; cliches; and insipid conversation).  No vulgarity or bawdy language/situations, please.  1 - 2 pages, typed, single-spaced.  Due Tuesday, 2/14.

Week of 1/30

  • Rewrite sentence #2 for COHESION in the Clarity, Cohesion, and Coherence handout.  Rewrite the sentence on a separate piece of paper; please type it or print in ink.  Due Tuesday, 1/31.
  • Fix problem pronoun sentences 1 - 4 from the Clarity, Cohesion, and Coherence packet.  Please type or print the revised sentence on the same piece of paper you used in class today or staple a new piece of paper with your revised pronoun sentences to the front of the one you used today.  Due Wednesday, 2/1.
  • Word Power quiz on session 26 & 27:  Friday, 2/3.
  • Complete this handout (be sure and read the directions!). You can type directly on this handout!!   Due on Friday, 2/3.

SEMESTER 2 BEGINS!  1ST SEMESTER GRADES WILL NOT BE FINALIZED UNTIL SUNDAY, 2/5.

Week of 1/23

  • Read chapters 9 & 10 in Lord of the Flies for Monday, 1/23.  Choose ONE passage from either of these chapters to respond to.  PRINT YOUR RESPONSE AND BRING IT TO CLASS ON MONDAY, 1/23.
  • Complete "Sentence Fragments and Run-On Sentences A" (Clause handout) for Tuesday, 1/24.
  • Read chapters 11 & 12 in Lord of the Flies for Tuesday, 1/24. 
  • FINAL (Thursday, 1/26):  Final will cover literary and poetic terms, archetypes, grammar, elements of the essay, clarity & cohesion, and Lord of the FliesYou may use your style binder on the test, but you may not use your D.G.P. Appendix or the SAM handout.
  • FOR FINAL (Thursday, 1/26):  Copy and paste my comment (e.g., REWRITE THIS SENTENCE FOR CLARITY) and your original sentence on a blank piece of paper for the final.  During the test, you will rewrite that sentence as directed by my comment.

Week of 1/17

  • Read chapters 4 & 5 in Lord of the Flies for Tuesday, 1/17.  Choose a passage from chapter 4 and a passage from chapter 5 that you think shows something important about theme, character, setting, story development, writer's craft, etc..  Write your "journal" entries (200 words each) in Googledocs and put them in the class folder.  Due Tuesday, 1/17.
  • Read chapters 6, 7, and 8 in Lord of the Flies for Thursday, 1/19.  Choose TWO passages from any of those three chapters about which to write your insightful entry!.  Your entries are due Friday, 1/20.
  • Read chapters 9 & 10 in Lord of the Flies for Monday, 1/23.  Choose ONE passage from either of these chapters.
  • Read chapters 11 & 12 in Lord of the Flies for Tuesday, 1/24.  Be ready to discuss!
  • FINAL (Wednesday, 1/26):  Final will cover literary and poetic terms, archetypes, grammar, elements of the essay, clarity & cohesion, and Lord of the FliesYou may use your style binder on the test, but you may not use your D.G.P. Appendix or the SAM handout.

Week of 1/9

  • In-class write on poem:  Monday, 1/9.  You may use your notes!  PROMPT:  How do the poet's stylistic choices (e.g., meter; figurative language; rhyme, etc.) contribute to the overall theme of the poem?  POEM ESSAY IS DUE ON TURNITIN.COM AT 11:59 pm.
    • FIT needs to be completed for your poem in order to do the in-class write.  Find at least 8 facts about your poem and choose three facts to "interpret" or draw inferences upon.  Then, write a theme statement. 
    • Your essay will be submitted to the class folder.
    • On Tuesday, 1/10:  Turn in the above FIT pre-writing work, the TP-CASTT notes activity, and the homework from 1/6 (i.e., identifying stanza, meter, rhyme, etc. on poem).
  • FIT for "Richard Cory" due on Tuesday, 1/10.  (Most of this was completed in class.  Be sure to complete the 3 interpretations and write a theme statement for the poem).
  • Clarity, Cohesion, and Coherence handout.  Please print for Tuesday, 1/10.
  • Read chapter 1 of The Lord of the Flies for Wednesday, 1/11.  Keep an informal list of "things I noticed."
  • Print a hard copy of your poetry essay for Thursday, 1/12.
  • Using the "First Rule of Clarity,"  fix sentences 1 - 4 on your handout.  Due Thursday, 1/12.
  • Read chapters 2 & 3 of The Lord of the Flies for Friday, 1/13.
  • POETRY OUT LOUD POEM RECITATION (optional):  Friday, 1/13.

Week of 1/3

  • DGP:  Find CLAUSES ("Wednesday") for each of the following sentences. 
      • (Tuesday):  Alfonso my mother's cousin bought new running shoes since he enjoys running.
      • (Wednesday):  The guy who sits behind Marsha likes to play the drums on his desk during class..
      • (Thursday):  Paul's friend moved here from Manteca California on January 22 2005 but now his family is moving again.
      • (Friday):  Ethel's friend Kaitlyn likes to babysit so that she can play with the children's toys.
  • Find a poem that "speaks" to you :) for Tuesday, 1/3.  You will be married to this poem for the next three weeks, so make sure you like it.  It needs to be at least 14 lines long, written by a recognized poet (i.e., a poet whose work could be found in an anthology) and NOT a children's poem (e.g., Suess or Shel Silverstein)
  • TP-CASTT handout.
  • Antigone essay rewrites:  Please rewrite your essay according to my comments/editing and our conference discussion.  The rewritten essay should be submitted to the CLASS FOLDER and TURNITIN.COM BY JANUARY, 4, 2017.
  • Analyze your poem for stanza forms, rhyme, and meter.  (If your poem is "free verse," it may have some rhyme and some meter -- it just won't be regular).  Due on Friday, 1/6.
  • Bring in your Oedipus book on Friday, 1/6.
  • Clarity, Cohesion, and Coherence handout.  Please print for Tuesday, 1/10.
  • In-class write on poetry essay:  Monday, 1/9.  You may use your notes!

Week of 12/12

  • IF YOU ARE ONE WHO HAD TO REWRITE THE CREON PARAGRAPH AND HAVE NOT YET DONE SO, YOU HAVE UNTIL MONDAY, 12/19 TO FINISH IT, TO EMAIL ME, AND TO DROP THE ESSAY IN THE CLASS FOLDER, OR YOU WILL RECEIVE A ZERO.
  • Antigone essay rewrites:  Please rewrite your essay according to my comments/editing and our conference discussion.  The rewritten essay should be submitted to the CLASS FOLDER and TURNITIN.COM BY JANUARY, 4, 2017.
  • Prepare for your essay conference (see this handout); you will turn in the Antigone "Literary Planning Guide" at that time along with your conference notes and "Essay Mastery Checklist."
  • Write four DISCUSSION questions with well-developed, specific, supported-with-example answers on the movie The Dead Poet's Society.  Due Friday, 12/16 for Friday's seminar.
  • Find a poem that "speaks" to you :) for Tuesday, 1/3.  You will be married to this poem for the next three weeks, so make sure you like it.  It needs to be at least 14 lines long, written by a recognized poet (i.e., a poet whose work could be found in an anthology) and NOT a children's poem (e.g., Suess or Shel Silverstein)
  • Find at least 10 FACTS in your poem for Thursday, 1/5. No interpretation please!  Just the facts! [This activity is akin to note taking; you, of course, may use pencil]. Facts might include: 
    1. Who is the speaker? 
    2. What does the poem say about him/her? 
    3. What's the poem about (i.e., plot)?  What is the meter? 
    4. How would you describe what happens in each stanza? 
    5. Are there stanzas?  Is there meter?  Rhyme scheme? 
    6. What can you say about the language (denotation/connotation; syllables; diction level)? 
    7. Is there figurative language (e.g., simile, metaphor, personification, irony, understatement, hyperbole)? 
    8. Elements of sound (e.g., alliteration, assonance, consonance, onomatopoeia)? 
    9. Any shifts of any kind? 
    10. What do you notice about the punctuation? ETC. . . . .

Week of 12/5

  • Click on this University of Washington writing handout site.  Read the handout entitled, "Developing Your Thesis"  (it's the second to last handout on the initial handout list).  Use "The Six-Step Thesis Formation Method" to craft a thesis from one of the Antigone prompts.  Write the six steps down. THIS IS PRACTICE; YOU DON'T HAVE TO USE THIS THESIS STATEMENT.  Due Monday, 12/5
  • Induction work for Antigone essay (i.e., gathering evidence -- quotations & examples -- from the text) and working thesis due on Tuesday, 12/6. Fill in as much of the "literary analysis guide" as you can!  WE WILL WORK ON YOUR ESSAY IN CLASS.  Literary Analysis guide handout:  Click HERE.
  • Read "Constructing the Thesis:  A Writer's Clinic for Beginners" (pp 4 - 7) on the same handout (i.e., "Developing Your Thesis").  Due Monday, 12/5
  • Due to the distractions of the first snowfall of the year, the multi-paragraph Antigone essay is now due Saturday, 12/10 at 11:59 on Turnitin.com.  Antigone essay prompts

Week of 11/28

  • Print and read the archetype handout; find an example for as many situational, character, and symbol archetypes that you can -- we will brainstorm more together in class!  For Monday, 11/28.
  • Make a list of situational, character, and symbol archetypes that are in Antigone.  Due Wednesday, 11/30.
  • Read Antigone by Wednesday, 11/30;  we will seminar on Thursday, 12/1.  To prepare for the seminar, write FIVE discussion questions with answers (even if you are not sure or your thoughts are incomplete).  THIS ASSIGNMENT SHOULD BE TYPED OR PRINTED NEATLY IN PEN.  Topics to consider:
      • Parallels/contradictions to Oedipus Rex
        References to Greek gods (and their significance)
        Particular aspects of tragedy and/or Greek drama
        Parallels to contemporary society
        Observations
        Compelling quotes
        Things that seem confusing or contradictory
        Significant literary elements (e.g., the use of irony; motifs; symbols, etc.)
        Things you agree with/disagree with
        Archetypes
  • Antigone essay prompts.  Due date to be announced.  This is a multi-paragraph literary analysis essay response.
  • Seminar self-assessment:  Complete #2 -- give specific examples!  To what degree did you achieve the goal you had set for yourself?  Due on Friday, 12/2.
  • Induction work for Antigone essay (i.e., gathering evidence -- quotations & examples -- from the text) and working thesis due on Tuesday, 12/6. Fill in as much of the "literary analysis guide" as you can!  WE WILL WORK ON YOUR ESSAY IN CLASS.  Literary Analysis guide handout:  Click HERE.

Week of 11/21

  • Test on Oedipus Monday, 11/21. The test will also cover the history of Greek theater, terms (e.g., paradox, irony, stichomythia), and elements of Greek drama/tragedy, and vocabulary from the play.
  • Creative Writing #4:  Incorporate one aspect of Greek tragedy (e.g., tragic hero, chorus, oracle, Choragus, peripetiea, anagnorisis, etc.) into a piece of writing in which Thanksgiving plays some part.  Creative writing does NOT have to be a story, play, or poem; it can be an opinion piece or a journalistic piece of prose.  Perhaps, the Greek tragedy incorporation would be an allusion!  Anyway:  Please type, and have fun with it!  Piece should be at least a page in length.  Due 11/22.

Week of 11/14

  • Word Power quiz, sessions 24 & 25 on Friday, 11/18.
  • Finish grammar handout "Preposition or Adverb" by writing a sentence using the underlined word as the other part of speech.  Due Monday, 11/14.
  • Read Exodus for Monday, 11/14.
  • Read participial phrase tutorial; then do the  interactive quiz before class Wednesday, 11/16.
  • Test on OedipusMonday, 11/21. The test will also cover the history of Greek theater, terms (e.g., paradox, irony, stichomythia), and elements of Greek tragedy.

Week of 11/7

  • NO WORD POWER; NO CREATIVE WRITING; NO D.G.P. this week!
  • Read Scene 3 and Ode 3 for Monday, 11/7.
  • Print this handout for Monday, 11/7.
  • Read Scene 4 and Ode 4 for Tuesday, 11/8.
  • Using the Oly-paragraph on the handout above, identify the parts of the 5-part paragraph for each sentence (e.g., 1. CLAIM; 2. Reason #1).  Due Wednesday, 11/9.
  • Write a 5-part (Oly-) paragraph analyzing Creon's (you may want to compare/contrast him with Oediupus) or Jocaste's character.  Support your assertions with textual evidence!  Due Friday, 11/11 on Turnitin.com by 11.59 pm.

Week of 10/31

  • Word Power quiz, session 23 on Friday, 11/04.  Be ready for a "sentence parts & phrases" assessment, too!
  • Read Scene 1 and Ode 1 for Monday, 10/31.
  • D.G.P.:  (Sentence parts & phrases -- which is "Tuesday" in the Appendix)
    • MONDAY:  Mahua enjoys flying kites so we bought her a new ball of string.
    • TUESDAY:  The southside babtist church sponsored a festival my mother bought some french pastries there.
    • WEDNESDAY:  Wally was eager to prove that his dog blue was different from the other hunting dogs.
    • THURSDAY:  I must have drunk four cups of cocoa because I was frozen from skating on Lake Kenton.
  • PARAGRAPH (attach to Prologue homework):  Compare the Oedipus of the Prologue to the Oedipus of Scene 1.  Does he display the same characteristics in Scene 1 that he did in the Prologue?  If so, which ones?  Do you notice any new characteristics?  Is he a leader that you respect or not?  Does the Chorus's reaction in Ode 1 suggest that they are disappointed in their leader or their soothsayer (Teiresias), neither, or both?  Please use these questions to get you thinking, so that you can coherently -- and with focus -- answer the prompt (i.e., the first sentence).    Due Wednesday, 11/2.
  • Read Scene 2 and Ode 2 for Wednesday, 11/2.

Week of 10/24

  • No Word Power this week.
  • D.G.P.:  (Sentence parts & phrases -- which is "Tuesday" in the Appendix)
        • MONDAY: Many students worked on The Star our school newspaper.
        • TUESDAY: Someone's copy of Ethan Frome a novel was found in the room but my copy of the play Our Town is missing.
        • WEDNESDAY: BOTH Breck and Jolie drove their cars for a long time and then found themselves in Arkansas.
        • THURSDAY: The four men worked hard to finish the job; their boss gave them a large bonus.
  • Based on the "Prologue" only, make a list of characteristics attributed to Oedipus (minimum of EIGHT) by examining what other characters say about him, AND what he says about himself.
    1. Include the quotation, page number, and the characteristic suggested/stated about Oedipus.
    2. EXAMPLE: "Children, I would not have you speak through messengers" (4). FATHERLY ("children").
    3. For each adjective that you choose to describe Oedipus, please explain your thinking (e.g., "This quote reveals that Oedipus values an intimate relationship with his people.").
    4. THIS ASSIGNMENT MUST BE TYPED or PRINTED NEATLY IN PEN. Due Monday, 10/24.
  • Vocabulary Poster due Thursday, 10/27.  Click here for picture of poster template.  Also:  5TH PERIOD!!!! PLEASE CLICK ON THIS LINK BECAUSE I GAVE YOU THE WRONG VOCABULARY WORD AS YOU WERE LEAVING (and I was in a panic!!).
  • CREATIVE WRITING ASSIGNMENT #3:  "A Very Scary Periodic Sentence"
    • Read this lesson on periodic sentences from Grammar Monster.
    • Read the attached excerpt from "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" by Washington Irving.  Paragraph 1 is the first paragraph in the story; paragraph 2 comes from the middle of the story; and paragraph 3 comes from close to the end of the story.
    • Note which sentences are periodic! (We will talk about these in class on Wednesday).
    • NOW -- FOR FRIDAY, 10/28:  Write a paragraph for a ghost story that includes at least one periodic sentence.  You may use any of the ghostly suggestions in paragraph #2 (B) such as the woman in white, Major Andre, even the Headless Horseman, or invent one of your own!  UNDERLINE OR HIGHLIGHT YOUR PERIODIC SENTENCE(S).

Week of 10/17

  • NO D.G.P THIS WEEK!
  • Tuesday, 10/18:  Test on Greek gods & allusions.
  • Read "Prologue" in Oedipus Rex for Friday, 10/21.
  • Word Power quiz, sessions 21 & 22 on Friday, 10/21.
  • Based on the "Prologue" only, make a list of characteristics attributed to Oedipus by examining what other characters say about him, AND what he says about himself.
    1. Include the quotation, page number, and the characteristic suggested/stated about Oedipus.
    2. EXAMPLE: "Children, I would not have you speak through messengers" (4). FATHERLY ("children").
    3. For each adjective that you choose to describe Oedipus, please explain your thinking (e.g., "This quote reveals that Oedipus values an intimate relationship with his people.").
    4. THIS ASSIGNMENT MUST BE TYPED or PRINTED NEATLY IN PEN. Due Monday, 10/24.

Week of 10/10

  • NO WORD POWER; NO CREATIVE WRITING; NO D.G.P. this week!
  • Rewritten Mango thesis due on Monday, 10/10.
  • Read the article "Grand Allusion" and answer the questions for Monday, 10/10These answers should be typed using complete sentences!
  • Monday, 10/10 & Tuesday, 10/11:  We will be in the library doing research for the "Greek God & Goddess Presentation."  Click here for the assignment.
  • Wednesday, 10/12:  In-class work time/rehearsal (bring your art supplies, etc.).
  • Thursday, 10/13:  Presentations.

Week of 10/3

  • Please identify the parts of speech for these practice sentences (I have omitted the punctuation on purpose; you are expected to correct punctuation):
    • MONDAY:  I must have drunk four cups of cocoa because I was frozen from skating on Lake Kenton.
    • TUESDAY:  Can you lend Larry and me that Literary Cavalcade magazine or does your group need it to finish the assignment?
    • WEDNESDAY:  While we were driving on the Brewton Highway we saw a burning garage with several cars in it.
    • THURSDAY:   My uncle from Pittsburgh Pennsylvania recently bought a boat which he will keep on our lake.
  • Here is an on-line version of the DGP appendix (so that you don't have to take your Style Binder home every night): APPENDIX
  • Due Tuesday, 10/4:  Write a THEME statement based on your summer assignment essay.  We will write the thesis statement in class on Tuesday.
  • Due Wednesday, 10/5:  Write a THESIS statement for your summer assignment based on theme (make sure your theme statement is perfect -- simple and clear!).  See examples below:
    • THEME SUBJECT:  ambition
    • THEME STATEMENT:  The play Macbeth by William Shakespeare is about ambition and reveals that too much ambition can be morally corrupting.
    • THESIS STATEMENT:  In William Shakespeare's play Macbeth, overweening ambition not only corrupts Macbeth, but, more significantly corrupts the morals of Scotland.
    • (OR) In William Shakespeare's play Macbeth, the motifs of beasts, storms, and unnatural behavior convey the thematic idea that ambition is morally corrupting.
  • CREATIVE WRITING ASSIGNMENT #2: Due Friday, 10/7  (Please note:  My examples are shorter than what you should actually duplicate.)
    1. Find a paragraph from a fiction or non-fiction piece whose words are strongly connotative (e.g. "You stupid, driveling idiot," said the red-faced clown to the trembling tow-headed tot.  The clown, painted tears running down his face, pushed the boy out of the way as he picked up what was left of his blue balloon dog."  Strongly connotative, huh?) 
    2. Rewrite the piece to create a different tone by choosing words that convey a contrasting or opposite connotation (e.g., "It's okay," said the red-faced clown to the trembling tow-headed tot.  The clown, painted smile lines outlining his bright eyes, patted the boy gently and then crouched down to pick up the deflated blue balloon dog.")
  • Revise sentences 1 - 6 (blue, 1/2 sheet) for DICTION.  Identify the error in type and substitute a word or phrase that fits the context of the sentence.  Due Friday, 10/7.
  • Final PARTS OF SPEECH quiz on Friday, 10/7.  (You are excused from this quiz if you received a 85% or better on quiz #1).

Week of 9/26

  • Please identify the parts of speech for these practice sentences (I have omitted the punctuation on purpose; you are expected to correct punctuation):
    • MONDAY:  (We will do the sentence "The four men . . ." from last week.)
    • TUESDAY:  Mahua enjoys flying kites so we bought her a new ball of string.
    • WEDNESDAY:  The southside babtist church sponsored a festival my mother bought some french pastries there.
    • THURSDAY:  Wally was eager to prove that his dog blue was different from the other hunting dogs.
  • Reread The House on Mango Street for Wednesday's (9/28) culminating seminar.  Seminar Question: Did your ideas about theme and character change from the first time you read it?  PLEASE PREPARE FOR THIS SEMINAR BY TAKING NOTES ON THE FOLLOWING:
    • What did you discover that you missed the first time through (maybe this "discovery" is about character, theme, Cisneros's style, motif, organization, etc.).
    • What vignette was your favorite the second time through as opposed to the first?  Or, if the vignette favorite has not changed, what in the vignette intensified your choice?
    • Write 2 DISCUSSION questions AND answers that are based in the text.  This means the question should include specific details and/or quotes from the text as a basis for the question.  For example, What three experiences do you think influenced Esperanza the most in her decision to become a writer?  OR Some of Cisneros's vignettes incorporate fairy tale elements such as "There Was an Old Woman She Had So Many Children She Didn't Know What to Do" and "The Family of Little Feet."  How do fairy tales connect to Esperanza's loss of innocence?
  • Fill out orange seminar self-evaluation for Thursday, 9/29.  On the back of the form (or on another piece of paper), please answer the following questions:
    1. What did you do well during the seminar?  What would you like to work on or get better at for the next seminar?
    2. What did you think about the seminar as a whole?  What were the strengths and weaknesses?  What dynamics did you notice, if any?
  • Final draft of "My Name" essay is due on Thursday, 9/29. This essay should be typed, single spaced. (NOTE: You do not have to have six paragraphs. You need only adhere to the four parts of her essay.)
        1. Please include A SENTENCE THAT EXPLAINS THE UNIFYING IDEA BEHIND YOUR PIECE -- a theme statement. What IDEA are you trying to convey? (Example, "My vignette shows the difficulty of growing up religious in a secular society," or "My vignette celebrates how cross country helped me discover my mental toughness," or "My vignette exposes the pressure to be perfect in a family of 'straight-A students."). This sentence should be written on the back of your paper.
        2. Caution: THIS IS A FICTION PIECE; IT IS NOT YOUR AUTOBIOGRAPHY. Do use your personal experiences to enrich/inform your writing, but don't feel constrained by "the truth."
        3. Finally, YES, you must change your name in the final paragraph! Do not write --"I really like my name and would never change it because it really reflects who I am." Again, this is a fiction piece. The goal, again, is to imitate how Cisneros uses figurative language, syntax, diction, imagery, punctuation, point of view, organization, and tone.
        4. Submit "Style Imitation" in class folder AND print a hard copy.
        5. DON'T FORGET: Attach your annotated "My Name" handout (salmon/orange color). The rubric should be on top.
  • Word Power quiz, sessions 19 & 20 on Friday, 9/30.
  • Bring Creative Writing Journal to class on Friday, 9/30.

Week of 9/19

  • Please identify the parts of speech for these practice sentences (I have omitted the punctuation on purpose; you are expected to correct punctuation):
      • MONDAY: Many students worked on The Star our school newspaper.
      • TUESDAY: Someone's copy of Ethan Frome a novel was found in the room but my copy of the play Our Town is missing.
      • WEDNESDAY: BOTH Breck and Jolie drove their cars for a long time and then found themselves in Arkansas.
      • THURSDAY: The four men worked hard to finish the job; their boss gave them a large bonus.
  • THOROUGHLY annotate the vignette "My Name."  Due Wednesday, 9/21.
  • Finish writing THEME STATEMENT for "My Name."  Be sure and write it on the back of the orange "My Name" handout.  Due Friday, 9/23.
  • Creative Writing Journal #1:  What punctuation mark are you?  (You may type or hand-write.  Write for 15 - 30 minutes.  You may respond to this question in any genre you choose -- poem, essay, play.)  Due Friday, 9/23.

 

  • Final draft of "My Name" essay is due on Wednesday, 9/28. This essay should be typed, single spaced. (NOTE: You do not have to have six paragraphs. You need only adhere to the four parts of her essay.) DON'T FORGET: Attach your annotated "My Name" handout (the salmon/orange color) and rough draft to the back of your imitation. The rubric should be on top.
        • Please include A SENTENCE THAT EXPLAINS THE UNIFYING IDEA BEHIND YOUR PIECE -- a theme statement. What IDEA are you trying to convey? (Example, "My vignette shows the difficulty of growing up religious in a secular society," or "My vignette celebrates how cross country helped me discover my mental toughness," or "My vignette exposes the pressure to be perfect in a family of 'straight-A students."). This sentence should be written on the back of your paper.
        • Caution: THIS IS A FICTION PIECE; IT IS NOT YOUR AUTOBIOGRAPHY. Do use your personal experiences to enrich/inform your writing, but don't feel constrained by "the truth."
        • Finally, YES, you must change your name in the final paragraph! Do not write --"I really like my name and would never change it because it really reflects who I am." Again, this is a fiction piece. The goal, again, is to imitate how Cisneros uses figurative language, syntax, diction, imagery, punctuation, point of view, organization, and tone.
  • Reread The House on Mango Street for Tuesday's (9/27) culminating seminar.  Seminar Question: Did your ideas about theme and character change from the first time you read it?

Week of 9/12

  • Due Monday, 9/12:  Choose three vignettes from The House on Mango Street that share some characteristic (e.g., subject; theme; phrase; imagery).  Then, annotate each "richly."
  • Your personal introductory letter should be finished and ready to submit to turnitin.com on Tuesday, 9/13 (Mrs. Lang has the "cow" reserved for Monday)We will do this in class!
  • Due Tuesday, 9/13 (before class starts):  Come up to me and say, "I love the rhetorical triangle," and I will give you an extra credit sticker.
  • Due Wednesday, 9/14:  Read, print, and sign the syllabus for Honors English 10.
  • Due Wednesday, 9/14: Turn in your annotated 3 vignettes (see Monday, 9/12).  Please copy the pages if you used post-it notes OR if you wrote directly in your book.
  • WE WILL WORK ON THE DOMAIN RESPONSE/ESSAY IN CLASS ON FRIDAY, 9/16.  (You could plan it a little if you like). 

Week of 9/7

  • For Thursday, 9/8:  Annotate (whatever that means to you) the vignette "Those Who Don't."
  • OPTIONAL (for 9/8):  Prepare a super-short speech on why you would like to be our class senator.