Olympia

High School

1302 North Street
Olympia, WA 98501
Phone: (360) 596-7000
Attendance: (360) 596-7003
Fax: (360) 596-7001

Week of 1/25

  • For Monday, 1/25, answer (please type) the following about Part 3, "Garnering":  THE FIRST QUESTION IS A BONUS QUESTION ONLY!!  YOU DON'T HAVE TO ANSWER IT!
    1. "Hard" (as in "firm and unyielding") occurs in such expression as "hard-hearted" ("unfeeling or harsh"), and in the sense of indigent in "hard up." We talk of "hard facts" to meaning "data unadorned or unembroidered with subjectivity" and a "hard nut to crack" for an especially difficult problem, riddle, enigma, or conundrum. Somebody who is "hard of hearing" is nearly deaf. Somebody who insists upon a "hard line" is severe and judgmental; a "hard winter" is unpleasantly or unseasonably cold; a "hard bargain" implies no concession to sentimental or personal considerations. "Hard" times are necessarily "trying times," especially in terms of availability of employment. (www.victorianweb.org/authors/dickens/hardtimes/pva309.html)

    To what extent may the title of the novel – Hard Times for These Times – be applied to three of the novel’s principal characters? Consider the social, educational, monetary, and personal implications of the phrase “hard times.”

    1. Examine the symbols surrounding Stephen’s tragic end. What do they suggest?
    2. Why does Bounderby lie about his past?   How do his personal fiction and favorite maxims become grossly ironic in light of the truth?
    3. Why is Part 3 called “Garnering”? What is “gathered and stored” or “collected”?
  • FINAL (AUTHOR BIO. & LITERARY MOVEMENTS.)

Week of 1/19

  • Read chapters 1 - 3 of Book 3 for Wednesday, 1/20.
  • "Tess Tuesday" & "Tess Thursday."
  • Read to end of Book 3 for Monday, 1/25.
  • College Essay or Cover Letter & Resume (graduation requirement):  due by Friday, 1/22.
  • For Monday, 1/25, answer (please type) the following about Part 3, "Garnering":  THE FIRST QUESTION IS A BONUS QUESTION ONLY!!  YOU DON'T HAVE TO ANSWER IT!
    1. "Hard" (as in "firm and unyielding") occurs in such expression as "hard-hearted" ("unfeeling or harsh"), and in the sense of indigent in "hard up." We talk of "hard facts" to meaning "data unadorned or unembroidered with subjectivity" and a "hard nut to crack" for an especially difficult problem, riddle, enigma, or conundrum. Somebody who is "hard of hearing" is nearly deaf. Somebody who insists upon a "hard line" is severe and judgmental; a "hard winter" is unpleasantly or unseasonably cold; a "hard bargain" implies no concession to sentimental or personal considerations. "Hard" times are necessarily "trying times," especially in terms of availability of employment. (www.victorianweb.org/authors/dickens/hardtimes/pva309.html)

    To what extent may the title of the novel – Hard Times for These Times – be applied to three of the novel’s principal characters? Consider the social, educational, monetary, and personal implications of the phrase “hard times.”

    1. Examine the symbols surrounding Stephen’s tragic end. What do they suggest?
    2. Why does Bounderby lie about his past?   How do his personal fiction and favorite maxims become grossly ironic in light of the truth?
    3. Why is Part 3 called “Garnering”? What is “gathered and stored” or “collected”?

Week of 1/11

  •  Read chapters 1 - 6 of Book 2 (Hard Times) for Tuesday, 1/12.
  •  Read chapters 7 & 8 of Book 2 for Wednesday, 1/13.
  •  Read chapters 9 - 12 for Friday, 1/15; seminar!  Part 2 is called "Reaping."  As in Part 1, consider what was reaped and by whom.  Did anyone reap something that they did not sow?  Look up some common idioms and Bible verses (the Bible was a dominant text in 19th century England) that concern sowing and reaping.  Do any apply to Book 2?  If so, how?
  • Written preparation for seminar due Friday, 1/15:  Write at least 3 points in reference to the question(s) about Part 2. EXPLAIN YOUR IDEAS!   Find textual evidence to support your claims.  Type or print neatly in pen.
  • College essay due Friday, 1/22.  Be sure to write the prompt at the top of your essay.  (If you want feedback from me, write that at the top, too.)

Week of 1/4

  • Read chapters 1 - 5 in Hard Times for Tuesday, 1/5.
  • Read chapters 6 - 9 in Hard Times for Wednesday, 1/6.
  • Find a picture that depicts ONE of the areas of social reform in England (1840's - 1890's; yes this is beyond Victoria . . .).  Place that picture on your book cover and be ready to discuss the problem and the reform on Wednesday, 1/6.
  • Read chapters 10 - 16 [end of Part 1, "Sowing"] by Friday, 1/8.  Be ready to seminar!  Our overarching question is:  Why is Part 1 called "Sowing"?  What kinds of seed are sown?  What might grow?  (And because so few of you check the website as you should, please accept my bonus points for actually PREPARING for the seminar.  Bullet ideas and textual support that you can reference during the seminar.)

Week of 12/14

  1. For Monday, 12/14:  Answer the following questions based on Shelley's "Defense of Poetry."
    • What surprised you about Shelley's position on poets and/or poetry?
    • With which of his ideas do you agree?  With which do you disagree?
    • What one idea can you apply to your poem or delivery or "defense" on Tuesday?
  2.  Choose a short poem (14 - 20 lines?) and memorize it (Be sure and review the rubric for specific requirements). Also, make a "tarot card" (see William Blake's Romantic Tarot cards on line) for your poem in which you illustrate the main romantic idea/theme from your poem. Be sure and write the significant word somewhere on the card (e.g., "mystery").  Due Tuesday, 12/15.
    • EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY:  Due Thursday, 12/17.
      • Write a multi-paragraph essay analyzing some aspect of the poem (e.g., theme, poetic elements, language, images, etc.).
      • (OR) Write a 15 - 20 line poem emulating the same STYLE as your poet.  Your poem must be illustrate the characteristics of Romanticism.

Week of 12/7

  1. TEST on Sense and SensibilityMonday, 12/7
  2. Reading journal due on Tuesday, 12/8.  Here is the rubric.
  3. ANOTHER TEST (new one) ON SENSE & SENSIBILITY (unless the cheaters turn themselves in):  Thursday, 12/10.
  4. Choose three Romantic Era (1790 - 1850ish) poems that you might like to recite.  We will assign the poems on Thursday, 12/10.  Romantic poets whose poems you might want to consider include:  Wordsworth, Coleridge, Blake, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Lord Byron, John Keats, the Brownings (Elizabeth Barrett Browning or her husband), Mary Robinson, Charlotte Smith, Anna Letisha Barbauld, Robert Burns, Walter Scott, James MacPherson or even Cowper.
  5. Choose a short poem (14 - 20 lines?) and memorize it (Be sure and review the rubric for specific requirements). Also, make a "tarot card" (see William Blake's Romantic Tarot cards on line) for your poem in which you illustrate the main romantic idea/theme from your poem. Be sure and write the significant word somewhere on the card (e.g., "mystery").  Due Tuesday, 12/15.
  6. EXTRA CREDIT OPPORTUNITY:  Due Thursday, 12/17.
    1. Write a multi-paragraph essay analyzing some aspect of the poem (e.g., theme, poetic elements, language, images, etc.).
    2. (OR) Write a 15 - 20 line poem emulating the same STYLE as your poet.  Your poem must be illustrate the characteristics of Romanticism.
  7. Make a "calling card" (no points awarded for this) for Friday, 12/11 IF you would like to participate in our December 18th homemade gift exchange.

Week of 11/30

  1. NOTES on marriage (class 11/24):  Click here.
  2. NOTES on calls/calling cards (class 11/30):  Click here.
  3. Read chapters 1 - 4 in Part 3 of Sense and Sensibility for Monday, 11/30.
    • JOURNAL:  Choose one quote from the four chapters that you think best captures the "prevailing winds" of the section and justify your choice.  This is due on Tuesday, 12/1.
  4. Finish book for Thursday, 12/3.  JOURNAL:   Did Willoughby sincerely love Marianne or no?  Support your position with examples from the text Due Thursday, 12/3, as well!
  5. TEST on Sense and SensibilityMonday, 12/7
  6. Reading journal due on Tuesday, 12/8.  Here is the rubric.

Week of 11/23

  1. Read the remainder of Part 2 for Monday, 11/23.  Be ready for a quiz!
    • Love Letter due on Tuesday, 11/24.  THIS LOVE LETTER DOES NOT NEED TO FOLLOW THE PLOT; IT CAN BE FUNNY!  MAYBE MR. PALMER WRITES TO ELINOR or BRANDON WRITES TO MARIANNE (probably more seriously).  TRY TO EMULATE CHARACTER AND IMITATE THE STYLE OF LETTER WRITING AS SHOWN IN PART 2.
  2. Quilling card due by Wednesday, 11/25.  (Although you can turn it in at any point!)

Week of 11/16

  1. Read chapters 16 - 22 for Monday, 11/16.
    • Corresponding journal assignment due Tuesday, 11/17.
  2. Read chapters 1 - 5 of Part 2 for Wednesday, 11/18; miniature due on Friday, 11/20.
  3. (You know who you are): Please respond to the following questions for chapters 1 - 5 of Part 2.  This response must be written using complete sentences and must be supported with textual evidence (type or print in ink).  Due Friday, 11/20.
    • What is the funniest line/moment?  Explain.
    • What is the most insincere or most hypocritical moment?  Explain.
    • What is the rudest moment?  Explain.
    • Who becomes more or less (Choose one) likable in these five chapters?
  4. Quilling card due by Wednesday, 11/25.  (Although you can turn it in at any point!)
  5. Read the remainder of Part 2 for Monday, 11/23.  Be ready for a quiz!
    • Love Letter due on Tuesday, 11/24.

Weeks of 11/2 & 11/9

  1. Test #2:  Gawain - Restoration Theater on Monday, 11/9.   You may use your PERSONAL HANDWRITTEN notes FROM CLASS only.  NO COMPILING NOTES FROM A SINGLE SOURCE!   AND NO HANDOUTS!!  The test will cover poetic form (e.g., "bob and wheel"), history (e.g., Becket, the King James Bible), culture (e.g., chivalry, significance of the pentangle, the Aberdeen Bestiary, seven deadly sins, puritans v. theaters, how theater & culture changes under Charles II), and general textual significance (e.g., Who are the idealized/satirized characters in Chaucer's Prologue?).
  2. Read chapters 1 - 10 of Sense and Sensibility for Tuesday, 11/10. Please print this corresponding journal assignment.
    • Character analysis due Tuesday, 11/10.
  3. See "What We Did in Class Today" for notes taken on Tuesday, 11/10
  4. Read chapters 11 - 15 of Sense and Sensibility for Thursday, 11/12.
    • Corresponding journal assignment due Friday, 11/13.
  5. Read chapters 16 - 22 for Monday, 11/16.
    • Corresponding journal assignment due Monday, 11/16.

Week of 10/26

  1. Pilgrim presentations due Tuesday, 10/27.  Click here for rubric (See page 2 on handout).

Week of 10/19

  1. Write a 1-page (single space) analysis of "Fitt 3."  What does the juxtaposition of the hunting and bedroom scenes suggest? Submit your paper on Turnitin.com by 11:59 pm, Wednesday, 10/21.
  2. Pilgrim Profile Project:  handout.  Due Tuesday, 10/27.

Week of 10/12

  • If you were absent on Thursday, 10/15:  Please watch the following lecture by Professor Jackson.  http://online.hillsdale.edu/course/books101/part11/week-11/lecture
  • Write a paragraph/response:  Who is the better knight.  Bertilak or Gawain?  Justify you position with examples from the lecture and /or story.  Due Monday, 10/19.

Week of 10/5

  • Final discussion on Beowulf, Monday, 10/5.
  • Test on Beowulf, the elements of Anglo Saxon poetry, & the "History of the English Language":  Tuesday, 10/6.

Week of 9/28

  • Read 19 - 23 for Tuesday, 9/29.
  • Read 24 - 31 for Wednesday, 9/30.
  • Read 32 -35 for Thursday, 10/1.
  • Read 36 - 43 (the end) for Friday, 10/2
  • Please read and sign the formal syllabus for Friday, 10/2.
  • TEA DAY:  Friday, 10/2!

Week of 9/21

  • Read "Prologue" and chapters 1 - 9 of Beowulf for Tuesday, 9/22.
  • 5th PERIOD ONLY:  Collect "resume" information from chapters 4 - 9 (make notes) that can be added to the group resume on Wednesday, 9/23.    Use this document (click here) to help organize the information, and be ready to turn it in for points.
  • Resume presentation:  Wednesday, 9/23.
  • Read through chapter 18 for Thursday, 9/24.  Expect a quiz!
  • Bring (if you like) a prompt for one of your college applications for Friday, 9/25.

Week of 9/14

    • Beginning of Tuesday/Thursday "Author Bio's": the "Author-Bio" project requirements: PICTURE OF AUTHOR; NAME OF AUTHOR; DATE OF BIRTH/DEATH; FAMOUS WORKS, GREATEST CONTRIBUTION TO BRITISH LITERATURE (i.e., wrote the 1st dictionary; started a literary movement, etc.) ; NOTORIOUS FACTS or SCANDALOUS STORY.
  • Read "The Wife's Lament"; why is she in exile?  What does this poem suggest about Anglo-Saxon marriage, culture, and gender expectations.  Be ready to share your ideas on Tuesday, 9/15.
  • If you were absent on Thursday, 9/17, please watch the following video.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1C0sFXU0SLo  Take notes, and you may use them on the quiz.
  • Quiz on Michael Woods' Beowulf documentary:  Friday, 9/18.